Assignments

African History Project - Black Man Studying Computer5 copy

Assignments are an opportunity for students to demonstrate their understanding of the course materials.

They are not intended to catch students out – if you have completed the core readings, including attempting the knowledge questions, watched the lectures and attended the seminars, you will be in a good position for the assignments.

Assignments usually take the form of essays. Essays can be reflection essays or critical essays – the assignment instructions will confirm which. In a reflection essay, the task is to think about your own experience in light of the course materials and discuss how you now see things. In a critical essay, students are required to formulate and develop arguments supported by the source material. This essay is likely to require referencing which should be done in any of the standard academic referencing styles. In in doubt, use the Chicago Author-Date standard. 

Curriculum planning exercises are found in the courses in the Department of Education and could include drafting schemes of work, lesson plans or student handouts. 

You will find more specific information about assignments in your course materials including when tutors recommend you should complete and submit assignments. 

If you are unsure what an assignment is asking you to do or you are apprehensive about getting started, please reach out to your tutor who will be happy to provide extra information, guidance and support. 


Marking Descriptors

The AHP marking descriptors for essays are as follows:

First Class (70+)

  • Persuasive and direct answer to the question, establishing the wider significance of the issues concerned.
  • Comprehensive coverage of the relevant material; accuracy in the details.
  • A direct and coherent argument, well supported by relevant evidence.
  • Critical analysis of relevant concepts, theoretical or historiographical perspectives or methodological issues.
  • Fluent and engaging writing style; persuasive presentation and structuring of arguments.
  • Work which, in addition, displays evidence of creativity, originality, sophistication and freshness of arguments will be awarded marks of 75+.

Upper Second (60-69)

  • Direct answer to the question, establishing the wider significance of the issues concerned.
  • Adequate coverage of the relevant material, accuracy in the details.
  • Skilful mobilisation of evidence in relation to the argument being presented.
  • Narrative and description taking second place to analysis.
  • Competent manipulation of relevant concepts, theoretical or historiographical perspectives or methodological issues.
  • Fluent writing style; effective presentation and structuring of arguments.

Lower Second (50-59)

  • Basically satisfactory answer to the question.
  • Limited coverage of relevant material; some inaccuracy in the detail.
  • Some attempt to mobilise evidence in relation to the argument being presented.
  • Analysis taking second place to narrative and description.
  • Limited understanding of relevant concepts, theoretical or historiographical perspectives or methodological issues.
  • Adequate writing style, presentation and structuring of arguments.

Third (40–49)

  • Barely satisfactory answer to the question.
  • Inadequate coverage of relevant material; major inaccuracies in the detail.
  • No understanding of relevant concepts, theoretical or historiographical perspectives or methodological issues.
  • Poor presentation and structuring of arguments.

Fail (less than 40)

One or more of the following:

  • Serious misunderstanding of the question.
  • Failure to provide any answer to the question.
  • Failure to show knowledge of relevant material.
  • Seriously muddled presentation and structuring of arguments.

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